Thursday, October 6, 2011

Pedestrian Topic sentence

In a well constructed topic sentence, answer the following question: In Ray Bradbury's "Pedestrian", what does Leonard Mead most value and why?

55 comments:

  1. In the Pedestrian by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his freedom to stroll around at night and enjoy the simple elements of nature without an interfering government.

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  2. In Ray Bradbury's short story "The Pedestrian," Leonard Mead most values the world around him because he takes long walks while observing everything he passes.

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  3. In “The Pedestrian”, by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values alone time because he enjoys thinking, peacefulness and quietness without all of the technology that has been added into society.

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  4. In the short story, "The Pedestrian," by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his walks, not only to see the city, but to contemplate the society around him.

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  5. In Ray Bradbury's "Pedestrian", Leonard Mead values his freedom the most because he doesn't want to conform to the government's idea of how life should be lived.

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  6. In the "Pedestrian", the author makes it very clear that Leonard Mead values the simple task of walking. He had been walking for years, just for the pleasure of looking upon the empty streets and feeling the fresh air against his face. Trapped in a world of only technology, Leonard Mead valued reality.

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  7. In Ray Bradbury's "Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values his walks because they disconnect him from the world and the walks also have been consuming his nights for many years.

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  9. In "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his freedom to live a simple life and enjoy the outdoors without the government causing problems for him.

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  10. In the short story "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his individualism because throughout the story, he does what he wants to do, even if he is alone, and he defies the government by walking out in the open air.

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  11. In Ray Bradbury's short story "Pedestrian" Leonard Mead most values the little things in life, such as long walks around the neighborhood and thinking, because he does these things even though other people in his society do not think they are enjoyable.

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  12. In the short story The Pedestrian by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values nature because he is devoted to it so much that he has strolled around admiring it for 10 years.

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  13. In Ray Bradbury's "Pedestrian" Leonard Mead mist values inner peace because he takes long peaceful walks and nothing seems to other him, he is very happy.

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  14. In "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his walks to enjoy his surrounding as well as being alone with his thoughts.

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  15. In Ray Bradbury's novel "Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values nature because he is devoted to taking a walk every night even though no other human does.

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  16. In Ray Bradbury's, "Pedestrian", the character Leonard Mead most values his natural God given rights because he is free to think about whatever he feels without the government telling him otherwise.

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  18. In Ray Bradbury's story "Pedestrian" Leonard Mead most values freedom because he feels that in society it should be normal again to have the freedom to choose what a person wants to do versus all doing the same thing.

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  19. In Ray Bradbury's Pedestrian, Leonard Mead most values time by himself because he takes long walks at night to have time to think and to be free.

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  20. The "Pedestrian" written by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values freedom to walk around the city at night since he know the rest of the population just watches all the events happen on television, and does not go out to experience it.

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  21. In "The Pedestrian", by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his freedom from the norms of society, because he takes walks every night, just for the sake of taking walks, instead of watching television every night like everybody else does.

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  22. In the short story "Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury Mr. Mead vales freedom the most within society because he feels that everyone has the right to enjoy their own lives.

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  23. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values nature because he refuses to stay home and watch television like all the others, and instead decides to take long walks outside.

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  24. in Ray Bradbury's short story, "Pedestrian",Leonard Mead values his freedom because he wants to be outside and be able to walk around rather than be confined to his home.

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  25. In “The Pedestrian”, by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values the beauty of nature, because he feels that taking a walk is better than watching television.

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  26. In the short story "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his individuality because he does not conform to society's way of life.

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  27. In Ray Bradbury's short story "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values his freedom because he believes that every person should be able to do what they want to and not be constricted by their society.

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  28. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian," the character of Leonard Mead most values his freedom because he feels that everyone should be able to do what without being controlled by the government.

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  29. In the short story "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his individuality because he likes to take late night walks alone and think to himself instead of watching television like everyone else.

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  30. In Ray Bradbury's "Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values the little pleasures in life because he enjoys long walks over the media despite what the rest of society is like.

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  31. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values a thing as simple as taking a walk because they allow him to see nature and process his thoughts.

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  32. In the short story "Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values nature because he chooses to be the lone person who stands out and enjoys the nature of the outside world.

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  33. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead values his freedom the most because he feels trapped in a world of technology and on his walks he can escape them.

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  34. Leonard Mead, a character in Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian" values his freedom from conformity because he chooses to take walks around the city instead of watching television.

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  35. Leonard Mead, the main character, in Ray Bradbury's short story, "Pedestrian", most values the freedom to do as he pleases because he disregards both laws and cultural customs to go on his walks.

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  36. In the short story "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury the main character Leonard Mead most values his individual freedoms by wishing to walk late at night rather than watch the television and objects to being arrested for it.

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  37. In "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, the main character Leonard Mead most values serenity, because it allows him to reminisce about the old way of life, and escape from the controlling aspects of the government.

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  38. In Ray Bradbury's short story, "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values his thoughts because he spends every night wondering the streets just so he can let his thoughts run wild and take him wherever they want.

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  39. In Ray Bradbury's short story "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values his individualism because he loved to walk outside with no one around and he loved the silence of being alone.

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  40. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values freedom of choice because he wants to have the choice between going for a walk, watching television, or doing something else.

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  41. In "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead values the liberty of free thinking the most, because of his strolls at night in which he savors this last freedom that has not been taken away by the government.

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  42. In Ray Bradbury's short story "The Pedestrian", Leonard Meade most values his freedom because it allows him to venture out on his own, enjoying taking walks and observing his surroundings rather than spending his days inside.

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  43. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values his peace because it allows him to set his mind away form all of the worlds problems and be relaxed and stress free for a few hours.

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  44. In "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, the main character, Leonard Mead, values nature and the outdoors the most because he prefers to enjoy the peace and quiet of the outdoors instead of the sights and sounds of a premium television, challenges society when he tells the police he isn't watching the television he has, and claims to walk outside every day.

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  45. In "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead values freedom from the oppression of society defying the norm of others.

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  46. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values independence because he chooses to go for walks at night instead of letting the government dictate his activities.

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  47. In Ray Bradbury's short story,"The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values his individual freedom because he refuses to conform to the government and decides to do things his own way, such as his late night walks.

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  48. In "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, the main character Leonard Mead most values individualism because he refuses to conform to the societal change around him.

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  49. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian," Leonard Mead most values being an individual because he restrains against following society and leads his own life through his nightly walks.

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  50. Leonard Mead, in the short story "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, most values his rights because he enjoys expressing himself and does not want to be limmited.

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  51. In the short story "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury, Leonard Mead most values his unclaimed freedom and relationship with his surrounding environment.

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  52. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", the main character, Leonard Mead, most values his nightly freedom the most because he likes the peaceful surroundings.

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  54. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian," Leonard Mead most values being an individual because he restrains against following society and leads his own life through his nightly walks.

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  55. In Ray Bradbury's "The Pedestrian", Leonard Mead most values nature and the outdoors because he'd rather go on a walk on a November night and observe the outside world than go along with society and let technology take over his life.

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